Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin Temple, Hong Kong

The Wong Tai Sin Temple dedicated to the famous monk of Taoists “Wong Tai Sin” is one of the largest Taoist temples in Hong Kong and is located next to the Wong Tai Sin MTR station in the north Kowloon area. It is said to make “every wish come true upon request” and hence we sisters decided to test our luck in some traditional Chinese fortune-telling. The temple also famous for fortune-telling, was bustling with Chinese devotees rushing to offer their prayers carrying incense sticks and not wanting to be the odd ones out at the temple even we purchased the sticks from one of the stalls outside the temple.

Main entrance
Main entrance

 Wong Tai Sin Temple

The guardians of the Temple
The guardians of the Temple
Statue of the Temple guardian at the entrance
Statue of the Temple guardian at the entrance

Stone Pillar
The second arch

Hong Kong

The Temple has three huge beautifully constructed archways leading you to the main shrine. On left to the steps leading to the shrine are the lamps holding statues where you can burn the incense sticks. As we climb the steps to the main shrine the fragrance of the sandalwood burning greets us. The temple is decorated with bright red and gold and the traditional Chinese touch looks surreal midst the tall structures surrounding the temple.

Lamp holding statue
Lamp holding statue
Main altar
Main altar

The open space in front of the main altar is preserved for the people who want to practice “kau cim”: people kneel on the cushioned stools and shuffle the fortune sticks on bamboo cylinders as a part of the ritual of wish making. The fortune stick is then taken to any of the fortune tellers who are based near the temple for interpretation.

Main Altar

Wong Tai Sin Temple

People practicing Kau Cim
People practicing Kau Cim
Colourful lanterns
Colourful lanterns
Details on the Lanterns and the temple roof
Details on the Lanterns and the temple roof

Wong Tai Sin Temple

Large Bell at the Temple
Large Bell at the Temple

After watching the ritual for a while we walked down to right of the main altar towards the Confucius Hall dedicated to the great Master Confucius. A sweet Chinese man took time from his prayers and explained us the journey of Master Confucius to India and his preaching on Buddhism.

The Confucious Hall
The Confucious Hall

The path on the right of the Confucius Hall leads to the Good Wish Garden, a pretty and peaceful landscape midst the tall building. With its artificial pond and a waterfall the garden gives a pretty picture and makes one forget about the outside world. After relaxing and clicking a good number of pictures here, we walk back towards the temple premises passing through the Wall of Nine Dragons, which was modeled after the Beijing’s “Nine Dragon Wall”, and the lamp holding statues.

Pond at the garden
Pond at the garden

Good Wish Garden

Good Wish Garden
Good Wish Garden
Hong KongOutfit details: Croptop: Veromoda, Maxiskirt, handcuff: Forever21, Earrings: House of Fraser,UK
Waterfall at the Good Wish Garden
Waterfall at the Good Wish Garden
Hong KongOutfit details: Maxi dress: Pull&bear, Sling Bag: Mango, Butterfly necklace: Past Times, UK
Waterfall at the Good Wish Garden
Waterfall at the Good Wish Garden
Wall of 9 Dragons
Wall of 9 Dragons

 

At the exit of the temple there is a small open space with three gold painted statues and most of the female devotees gathered there. When we asked the priest present there he explained us it was the God of Love and praying to the God results in a good marriage for all the single girls. Like the other girls present there we joined them and tied the red thread to the rope hanging from the Gods arm and bid our goodbye to the beautiful place.

The God of Love
The God of Love

You can include the Chi Lin Nunnery and Nan Lian Garden in the same visit, which is at the next stop from the Wong Tai Sin at Diamond Hill.

If you guys liked our post do leave us a comment below and also subscribe for more updates on our upcoming posts!! 



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Social Media Widget Powered by Acurax Web Development Company